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Markus Aspelmeyer

University of Vienna, Austria and Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology (VCQ)

Friday, November 20th, 2015 at 11:30:00 AM

Conference Room Querzoli LENS

Enrico Fermi Colloquium

Published on-line at 02:16:45 PM on Thursday, November 19th, 2015

New Frontiers in Quantum Optomechanics: from levitation to gravitational quantum physics

Cavity Optomechanical systems have originally been studied from the early 1970s on in the context of gravitational wave antennas.

Cavity Optomechanical systems have originally been studied from the early 1970s on in the context of gravitational wave antennas. The last few years have seen a completely new generation of nano and microoptomechanical devices with diverse application domains ranging from classical sensing to quantum information processing. The developments in the field have even lead to a new coating technology for low-noise optical precision interferometry.

One of the fascinating prospects of quantum optomechanics is to coherently control the motional degree of freedom of a massive object in an unprecedented parameter regime of large mass and long coherence time, hence opening up a new avenue for macroscopic quantum experiments. A possible way to achieve this is by coupling a trapped, levitated object to an optical cavity field, hence strongly suppressing mechanical dissipation effects of typical micro- and nanomechanical devices.

Another fascinating perspective is to use mechanical quantum systems for testing low-energy consequences of possible quantum theories of gravity in table-top experiments. One specific example requires the ability to perform quantum non-demolition (QND) measurements of the mechanical motional quadratures. I will report on the recent advancements that have been achieved in these directions.

For further informations, please contact Francesco Marin.